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Motion and Forces (5-8)

* The motion of an object can be described by its position, direction of motion, and speed. That motion can be measured and represented on a graph.   * An object that is not being subjected to a force will continue to move at a constant speed and in a straight line.   * If more than one force acts on an object along a straight line, then the forces will reinforce or cancel one another, depending on their direction and magnitude. Unbalanced forces will cause changes in the speed or direction of an object's motion. (NSES, 1996)

In the rectangle above, you will find the fundamental concepts and principles that underlie this standard. Below you will find a list of recommended "learning tools" for this standard. All links are in yellow, just click the link. Numbers are for reference only. Use our "Tell a Friend" feature, at the bottom,  to send this page to a friend!

1 Simple Machines is a “learning tool” about simple and compound machines. This site presents information with bright colors and animation, and it features printable student hand-outs and teacher guidelines. This site is brought to us by Edheads. All of EdHeads simulations are conceptually clear, well designed and developmentally appropriate for students. A clear leader in the development of "learning tools" for science education!
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 Students love skateboards! Now they can design their own and see how well it works. The name of this learning tool is called Skate Park and comes to us from the great web site Phet. You need Java and then just click RUN NOW in the lower right to get started. Learn about conservation of energy with a skater dude! Build tracks, ramps and jumps for the skater and view the kinetic energy, potential energy and friction as he moves. You can also take the skater to different planets or even space!

3 Funderstanding Roller Coaster is the name of this learning tool. This simulator is designed for kids who want to design their own thrilling coaster and educators who want to use a cool activity to simulate the application of physics by using an exciting interactive tool. This site comes to us from Funderstanding.

4 The name of this elegant and effective "learning tool" is called Projectile Motion. Blast a Buick out of a cannon! Learn about projectile motion by firing various objects. Set the angle, initial speed, and mass. Add air resistance. Make a game out of this simulation by trying to hit a target. This tool is brought to us by The PhET Project and made possible by the Kavli Operating Institute.

5 The name of this "learning tool" is called Forces in Action. Use the blue arrows in the upper right hand corner to go through the simulation. This tool has been developed by the bbc.co.uk and their Science Clips program. These are very clear, concise, and effective lessons for young students. Flash is required.

6 The name of this "learning tool" is called Forces and Movement.  Use the blue arrows in the upper right hand corner to go through the simulation. Students can see the effect of varying weight and the gradient of a ramp. This tool has been developed by the bbc.co.uk and their Science Clips program. These are very clear, concise, and effective lessons for young students. Flash is required.
7 The name of this "learning tool" is Pendulum Experiment and has been developed by Fu-Kwun Hwong. You can perform classic pendulum experiments with your students. A period-initial angle plot is generated automatically, just click/drag the mouse and wait. Try and play with it to find out more features. If the initial set up looks difficult, click on the "simplify version link". 
8 This ingenious "learning tool" is called Soda Constructor. Don't let the name mislead you, this is one of the most creative physical science sites we have ever seen. In Soda Constructor, you use the soda constructor to make models out of masses linked by springs and muscles. Then you can manipulate this microworlds' gravity, friction, and spring stiffness. Stunningly life-like models are the result in this notable  achievement in web learning.

9 The unique & clever "learning tool" is called Galileo Drops the Ball. Around 1590 Galileo Galilei climbed up the Leaning Tower of Pisa and dropped some balls to the ground. Two balls of different masses, but of similar shape & density that were released together hit the ground at the same time.  Find out for yourself what a happens. This interactive was developed by the Schlumberger Excellence in Educational Development group. Be sure to visit their other interactives at their Science Lab. 

10 Spectacular is the only word for award winning Moovl. This is a  digital online drawing tool with lifelike dynamic properties. It allows children to create drawings that move according to simple rules of science. The environment simulates gravity, collision, & tension so that the pictures move as if they were in the real world. The Java Applet allows children to make predictions & hypotheses about how things in the world work, to visualize their ideas, & to test them out in a trial-&-error approach. The incredible people at Soda produced this great "learning tool".

11 This virtual lab is a tremendous example of how we can ask the "What if" questions with the right "learning tool". The name of this "learning tool" is called  Two Dimensional Collisions and comes to us from Michael Fowler and Drew Dolgert. One ball strikes another. Change relative masses, initial velocity, and angle of the collision. Watch it in the center of mass and lab frame. It makes the collision angles very clear, and the controls are sort of fun. This is a Java applet.

12 The name of this "learning tool" is called The Compound Machine. Learn how forces and simple machines can work together to create The Odd Machine! This creative, well designed, and conceptually clear tool is brought to us by Ed Heads and the Martha Holden Jennings Foundation.

13 The name of this clever "learning tool" is called Speed, Eggs and Slam. In this interactive lesson students find a way, through trial and error, to stop an egg from breaking in the back of a pick up truck. The truck is on an inclined plane ready to foil the student efforts. This is brought to us by the tremendous site called TryScience.
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The name of this learning tool is Fantastic Contraption. This is an amazing creation. Simple and challenging! An online flash game where you build whimsical machines to solve each level. Save your contraptions and share them with your friends. Fantastic Contraption takes inspiration from some of the great physics games that are out there.

15 This is a tremendous "learning tool" called Medieval Levers. In this clever and textured interactive student are introduced to a medieval, first class lever called a Trebuchet. After a brief introduction, students are asked to build and test their own! This interactive was produced by Wonderville and the groundbreaking pioneers of science education at  Science Alberta.

16 PhET continues to develop amazing interactives like Forces and Motion. Explore the forces at work when you try to push a filing cabinet. Create an applied force and see the resulting friction force and total force acting on the cabinet. Charts show the forces, position, velocity, and acceleration vs. time. View a Free Body Diagram of all the forces (including gravitational and normal forces). The main PhET site can be found here.

17 Students learn to shoot a bow and arrow by varying the forces and paying close attention to wind speed. It is challenging and well designed. The name of this "learning tool" is called Archery Game. This interactive was developed by the Schlumberger Excellence in Educational Development group. Be sure to visit their other interactives at their Science Lab.   
18 The name of this wonderful  "learning tool" is called The Doppler Train. Christian Doppler  noticed that sounds seemed to be of higher pitch when the listener and the source of the sound were approaching each other, and of lower pitch when they were moving away from each other. Find out for yourself! This interactive was developed by the Schlumberger Excellence in Educational Development group. Be sure to visit their other interactives at their Science Lab. 

 

 

 

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