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Position & Motion of Objects (K-4)

*  The position of an object can be described by locating it relative to another object or the background.   * An object's motion can be described by tracing and measuring its position over time.   * The position and motion of objects can be changed by pushing or pulling. The size of the change is related to the strength of the push or pull.   * Sound is produced by vibrating objects. The pitch of the sound can be varied by changing the rate of vibration. (NSES, 1996)

In the rectangle above, you will find the fundamental concepts and principles that underlie this standard. Below you will find a list of recommended "learning tools" for this standard. All links are in yellow, just click the link. Numbers are for reference only. Use our "Tell a Friend" feature, at the bottom,  to send this page to a friend!

1

The name of this "learning tool" is called Pushes and Pulls. Use the blue arrows in the upper right hand corner to go through the simulation. This tool has been developed by the bbc.co.uk and their Science Clips program. These are very clear, concise, and effective lessons for young students. Flash is required.

2

Simple Machines is a “learning tool” about simple and compound machines. This site presents information with bright colors and animation, and it features printable student hand-outs and teacher guidelines. This site is brought to us by Edheads. All of EdHeads simulations are conceptually clear, well designed and developmentally appropriate for students. A clear leader in the development of "learning tools" for science education!

3

This learning tool is called Sound and although it is designed for older students the visuals are so strong that they will help any age student learn the concept of sound waves. This comes to us from the wonderful web site called Phet and the University of Colorado. Just click RUN NOW once you get to the page to see this Java applet. This simulation lets you see sound waves. Adjust the frequency, volume, and harmonic content and you can see and hear how the wave changes. Move the listener around and hear what she hears.

4

The name of this "learning tool" is called Sound and Hearing. Use the blue arrows in the upper right hand corner to go through the simulation. This tool has been developed by the bbc.co.uk and their Science Clips program. These are very clear, concise, and effective lessons for young students. Flash is required.

5

The name of this fun and well designed "learning tool" is called Friction Explorer. The Friction Explorer lets you see how a sliding object behaves when you vary the force you push it with and the coefficient of friction. This interactive was developed by the Schlumberger Excellence in Educational Development group. Be sure to visit their other interactives at their Science Lab. 

6

The name of this wonderful  "learning tool" is called The Doppler Train. Christian Doppler  noticed that sounds seemed to be of higher pitch when the listener and the source of the sound were approaching each other, and of lower pitch when they were moving away from each other. Find out for yourself! This interactive was developed by the Schlumberger Excellence in Educational Development group. Be sure to visit their other interactives at their Science Lab. 

7

The name of this "learning tool" is called Friction. Use the blue arrows in the upper right hand corner to go through the simulation. This tool has been developed by the bbc.co.uk and their Science Clips program. These are very clear, concise, and effective lessons for young students. Flash is required.

8

The name of this "learning tool" is called Changing Sounds. Use the blue arrows in the upper right hand corner to go through the simulation. This tool has been developed by the bbc.co.uk and their Science Clips program. These are very clear, concise, and effective lessons for young students. Flash is required.

9

The name of this "learning tool" is called The Compound Machine. Learn how forces and simple machines can work together to create The Compound  Machine! This creative, well designed, and conceptually clear tool is brought to us by Ed Heads and the Martha Holden Jennings Foundation.

10

Spectacular is the only word for award winning Moovl. This is a  digital online drawing tool with lifelike dynamic properties. It allows children to create drawings that move according to simple rules of science. The environment simulates gravity, collision, & tension so that the pictures move as if they were in the real world. The Java Applet allows children to make predictions & hypotheses about how things in the world work, to visualize their ideas, & to test them out in a trial-&-error approach. The incredible people at Soda produced this great "learning tool".

11

The name of this learning tool is Sound Simulation and is a very clever and conceptually clear simulation. You can change lots of variables including the force, the object, and the duration. This wonderfully intuitive tool was created by Kees van den Doel. Lots of fun to play with! This is a Java applet.

12

The name of this learning tool is Fantastic Contraption. This is an amazing creation. Simple and challenging! An online flash game where you build whimsical machines to solve each level. Save your contraptions and share them with your friends. Fantastic Contraption takes inspiration from some of the great physics games that are out there.

 

 

 

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